OUR POSTER!
Poster For Types O' Honey

SCRIPT: JH=Jon Harris Z=Zainab

Both: Types Of Honey
JH: If the bees go, the honey goes
Z: All of Slide #2
JH: Different Categories Of Honey
Z: 1st Category and Def.
JH: 2nd Category and Def.
Z: 3rd category and Def.
JH: Last categorie and def.
Z: All Of Slide #4
JH: All of slide #5

Stuff to buy
Sour Wood honey
avacado honey
alfalfa honey

HONEY CATEGORIES

1

Our Topic: Types of honey.

Members of this group: Jake, Jon Harris, Oliver, Grace, Skylar and Zaniab

Our goal: To create a detailed, professional brochure based on the topic of honey.

Resources (Books):

Honey Handbook By: Kim Flottum Copyright Date: 2009 Pages: 78, 104, 108, 120, 121


Honeybee By: C. Marina Marchese Copyright Date: 2009 Pages:


Honey Crafting By: Leeann Coleman and Jayne Barnes Copyright Date: 2013 Pages: 91, 92, 93



Online Resources:

http://www.honey.com/honey-at-home/learn-about-honey/honey-varietals/
http://crazyazhoney.com/Colors.htm
http://www.armadillopeppers.com/types-of-honey.html
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/choosing-the-type-of-honey-you-will-harvest-from-y.html
http://www.lookchem.com/Chempedia/Health-and-Chemical/16479.html
http://www.honeyo.com/types.shtml
http://www.bjcp.org/mead/floral_guide.pdf
http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/honey/types.asp
https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/food_storage_faq/types_of_honey.htm#.UupzXH-9KSM

Tupelo honey is produced in the southeastern United States. Tupelo trees have clusters of greenish flowers, which later develop into soft, berrylike fruits. In southern Georgia and northwestern Florida, tupelo is a leading honey plant, producing tons of white or extra light amber honey in April and May. The honey has a mild, pleasant flavor and will not granulate. The Tupelo tree has been designated as being on the “Ark of Taste,” those plants and animals that are endangered and that must be protected.

Alfalfa

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Extra White
Not as sweet as most honeys.
Mild flavor

Avocado

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Dark Amber

Rich flavor

Basswood

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Water White

Taste similar to ripening fruit.

Blueberry

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Light Amber

Moderately fruity taste

Buckwheat

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Dark Amber

Pungent Flavor

Clover

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Extra Light Amber

Pleasing, Mild Taste

Eucalyptus

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Light Amber



Fireweed

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Water White

Delicate and sweet taste

Gallberry

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Water White



Orange Blossom

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Extra
Light Amber

combination of Citrus Flavors

Sage

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Extra White



Sourwood

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White



Tulip Poplar

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Amber



Tupelo

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Light Amber



Brochure Info is high lighted
The worker bees raise larvae and collect the nectar that will become honey in the hive. Leaving the hive, they collect sugary flower nectar and come home. In the hive, the bees use their "honey stomachs" to ingest and spit out the nectar a number of times until it is nearly digested.
Honey gets its start as flower nectar, which is collected by bees, naturally broken down into simple sugars and stored in honeycombs. The unique design of the honeycomb, coupled with constant fanning by the bees’ wings, causes evaporation to take place, creating the thick, sweet liquid we know as honey.

HARVESTING AND EXTRACTING


Beekeepers harvest honey by collecting the honeycomb frames and scraping off the wax cap that bees make to seal off honey in each cell.


Some most common types of honey


Alfalfa
  • Mild flavor
  • Similar aroma to beeswax
  • Ideal for baking and cooking
  • Used in daily table use
  • Extra white color
  • Blooms throughout the summer
  • Is the most important honey plant in most of the western states



Clover
  • Found in pantry shelves around the world
  • Sweet, flowery aroma
  • A key ingredient in baking and cooking
  • Excels at the table
  • Extra light amber color
  • Mild, delicate flavor
  • There are a few varieties of clover honey





Tupelo


  • Produced in northern Florida
  • Mild, pleasant flavor
  • Doesn’t granulate
  • Very thick
  • They develop into berry-like fruits
  • White or extra light color
  • The leading honey plant in Florida

Blueberry


  • Blueberry honey is the result of honeybees producing honey in a blueberry bush
  • Light amber color
  • Full well rounded flavor
  • Produced in New England and Michigan
  • Not part of the commercial blueberry business in Maine
  • Wonderful application in sauces
  • Wonderful in baked goods


Fireweed Honey


-Amber/Water white color
-Grows in the Northern Pacific states and Canada
-Delicate and sweet taste
-Monofloral honey
-A comb honey
-Gourmet hone
Tall perennial herb with large clusters of rose to purple flowers that grows back quickly after forest fires
thiere are more than 300 types of honey.

How Bees make Honey
First they taste and analzye the nectar. then the bee adds glucose oxidase and invertase. The bee then extends the bubble of the nectar to expose it to the warm dry hive air. Then it goes into a empty cell.





Most of us know honey as a sweet, golden liquid. However, honey can be found in a variety of forms.

COMB HONEY


Comb honey is honey in its original form; that is, honey inside of the honeycomb. The beeswax comb is edible!

CUT COMB


Cut comb honey is liquid honey that has added chunks of the honey comb in the jar. This is also known as a liquid-cut comb combination.

LIQUID HONEY


Free of visible crystals, liquid honey is extracted from the honey comb by centrifugal force, gravity or straining. Because liquid honey mixes easily into a variety of foods, it’s especially convenient for cooking and baking. Most of the honey produced in the United States is sold in the liquid form.

NATURALLY CRYSTALLIZED HONEY


Naturally crystallized honey is honey in which part of the glucose content has spontaneously crystallized. It is safe to eat.

WHIPPED (OR CREMED) HONEY


While all honey will crystallize in time, whipped honey (also known as cremed honey) is brought to market in a crystallized state. The crystallization is controlled so that, at room temperature, the honey can be spread like butter or jelly. In many countries around the world, whipped honey is preferred to the liquid form especially at breakfast time.



Alfalfa honey


The way the flower is designed, when the bees try to get the nectar, they have to really look for it as it is hidden from them. The bee has to put its head against the flower petal, and then the flower hits the bee in the face. Talk about “taking it on the chin.” :-) But, they learn to deal with it. Alfalfa honey is also heavy as compared to other honeys.

Sage honey

Sage honey can come from many different species of the sage plant. Sage shrubs usually grow along the California coast and in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Sage honey has a mild, delicate flavor. It is generally white or water-white in color. It is quite sweet in flavor, and pairs extremely well with strong cheeses. When shopping for Sage honey, note that there are several varieties of Sage - check out the Honey Locator website for Black Button Sage (shown), White Sage, Purple Sage and Mixed Sage.